Table of contents

 The parts of a notebook

The parts of a notebook

The tools to work with Jupyter and Zeppelin notebooks have easy-to-learn features, including menu and toolbar, action bar, and cells or paragraphs.

The notebook interface includes the following features:

Menu bar and toolbar

Menu and toolbar

You can select notebook features that affect the way the notebook functions and perform the most-used operations within the notebook by clicking an icon in the toolbar.

Notebook action bar

Action bar

You can select features that enhance notebook collaboration. From the action bar, you can:

  • Perform Git actions such as pull and push.
  • Create new assets.
  • Find and add data sets.

Jupyter terminal

Jupyter terminal

The terminal within a Jupyter notebook comes with git, pip, conda, and several other capabilities for data scientists.

To open a Jupyter terminal, expand the Launch Terminal icon ( Launch Terminal icon) and click the applicable Python version.

The cells in a Jupyter notebook

A Jupyter notebook consists of a sequence of cells. The flow of a notebook is sequential. You enter code into an input cell, and when you run the cell, the notebook runs the code and prints the output of the computation to an output cell.

You can change the code in an input cell and re-run the cell as often as you like. In this way, the notebook follows a read-evaluate-print loop paradigm. You can choose to use tags to describe cells in a notebook.

The behavior of a cell is determined by a cell’s type. The different types of cells include:

Jupyter code cells
You can edit and write new code in code cells.
Code cells
Jupyter markdown cells
You can document the computational process in Markdown cells. You can also:
  • Input headings to structure your notebook hierarchically.
  • Add and edit image files as attachments to the notebook.
The markdown code and images are rendered when the cell is run.
Markdown cells

See Markdown for Jupyter notebooks cheatsheet.

Raw Jupyter NBConvert cells
You can use raw NB Convert cells to write output directly or save code that you don’t want to run. Raw cells are not evaluated by the notebook.
Raw convert cells

The paragraphs in a Zeppelin notebook

An Apache Zeppelin notebook can contain a mixture of Scala, Python, and R paragraphs. The flow of a notebook is sequential. You enter code into an input paragraph, and when you run the paragraph, the notebook runs the code and prints the output of the computation to an output paragraph.

You can change the code in an input paragraph and re-run the paragraph as often as you like. In this way, the notebook follows a read-evaluate-print loop paradigm.
Paragraphs in a Zeppelin notebook